Once upon a time I made a blog about video games. And this is what's left of it (mostly tweets).

1 April

Frostpunk’s final timelapse of the player’s entire playthrough is a lovely cherry on top of an excellently designed game.

Frostpunk (PC) — 9/10

It’s not often I reach the end of a city management game. Well, for one thing, city management games don’t usually have endings — but the addition of a meaty narrative is exactly what kept involved until the end.

I can’t believe we made it! See, I’m worth putting in charge of the apocalypse!

Well, I guess I’ll go to hell then

Wow, you really pay for how good and beautiful Frostpunk is by way of interminable freezes every time the game saves, once your town is big enough to matter.

30 March

This game is amazing #SevenScrolls

@ff00aa:

CGA graphics looked good if you used the NTSC composite output 😯 [youtu.be]

29 March

@benz145:

It’s interesting that VR players who use joystick locomotion end up using room-scale movements much less often. Watching people play HLA with joystick; where I would have just taken a step forward, people are doing lots of micro movements to adjust their position.

28 March

Has no one modeled The Fountain’s space tree in VR yet?

Aaaannd ten minutes of virtual swimming is all that I can take.

Freediver: Triton Down likes to spawn the player with the head right above the water, which makes sense for the subject matter and is also extremely unsettling. (I can’t swim.)

Wolves in the Walls is fantastic

As far as passive VR narrative experiences go, they’ve done an excellent job of adding interactivity to make you part of the story without it feeling forced.

Huh, I didn’t even know Minecraft Earth was out. It… doesn’t make a great first impression, does it.

@CodeerStudio:

Procedural animation in 10 steps

#madewithunity #unitytips #unity3d #gamedev #indiedev

27 March

@phacktweets:

Surprise! Tilt Brush is available right now on PlayStation VR!

I wrote some mildly curated words:

[blog.us.playstation.com]

26 March

I’ve been thinking all afternoon about how I’d go about designing my own escape-room VR game but, like all my ideas these days: this too shall pass.

Well, that’s The Room VR finished, in three hours according to Steam. It’s… okay, I guess. My bad for expecting too much, but I feel like Fireproof has done so much with touchscreen puzzles, they could have made more of an effort to take advantage of VR.

The Room VR (PC) — 6/10

Needless to say, my appreciation of the game isn’t helped by having played Alyx earlier this week. I particularly wish I could teleport freely to explore the scene — take a hint from Valve and use lighting to emphasize active areas, instead of restricting my movement.

There’s a puzzle early on where you have to move an object around in your hand to activate it, and I wanted a lot more of that.

Looks like I’m 3/4 of the way through The Room VR… which makes sense considering the price. I’m not sure why they had to make a new game instead of porting the old ones, when very few of the puzzles actually take advantage of VR. It’s… fine, I guess 🤷🏻‍♂️

I can’t put my finger on what’s wrong with it, but Fireproof Games needs a new wood shader / textures / something. Big wooden structures have always looked a bit cheap in The Room games, but VR makes it that much worse.

25 March

Finally! I feel like it’s taken me forever to get there this time around (already played it on Xbox a while back) but Steam only says 15 hours played, which is not all that unreasonable.

Yesterday I left Alyx after encountering three heavy Combines in ten minutes and I don’t feel particularly impatient to get back in. I wish Valve’s first AAA VR game didn’t have to be a Half-Life game.

@iamleyeti:

Empires to Ages: Storytelling Lessons Learned in 14 Years at BioWare [youtu.be] is a fantastic talk about TRUST and how you build TRUST with your TEAM. Must watch for every #narrativedesign people